Infants with extra fingers may receive non-evidence-based, complication-prone treatment

Polydactyly, or having an extra finger, is fairly common, occurring in 1 in every 1,000 people—among African-Americans, 1 in 150. Children with supernumerary digits are usually treated within the first months of infancy. According to a case report and review in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, the standard technique for removing extra fingers is not supported by evidence and frequently causes complications.

Infants with extra fingers may receive non-evidence-based, complication-prone treatment

Polydactyly, or having an extra finger, is fairly common, occurring in 1 in every 1,000 people—among African-Americans, 1 in 150. Children with supernumerary digits are usually treated within ...

Mon 13 Nov 17 from Medical Xpress

Infants with extra fingers may receive non-evidence-based, complication-prone treatment, Mon 13 Nov 17 from Eurekalert

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