Using NASA satellite data to predict malaria outbreaks

Recently we’ve seen how researchers are using technology such as AI to detect Alzheimer’s early on, as early as 10 years, so it doesn’t really come as a surprise to learn that technology is also being used to detect disease outbreaks way before they can happen, like in the case of malaria where researchers use satellite data to predict potential outbreaks.Researchers are using data from NASA’s satellite’s to predict malaria outbreaks. This is done by identifying areas where the moist soil, due to floods or deforestation, can become a prime breeding ground for the mosquitoes that can transmit malaria. This has resulted in a system that is effective enough to anticipate malaria outbreaks as early as 3 months in advance, and can be pinpointed right down to individual households.According to Ben Zaitchik, the project’s co-investigator responsible for the LDAS component and an associate professor at Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, “It’s an exercise in indirect reasoning. The

Using NASA satellite data to predict malaria outbreaks

In the Amazon Rainforest, few animals are as dangerous to humans as mosquitos that transmit malaria. The tropical disease can bring on high fever, headaches and chills and is particularly severe ...

Wed 13 Sep 17 from Phys.org

Satellites Can Predict Malaria Outbreaks Months Before It Happens

Recently we’ve seen how researchers are using technology such as AI to detect Alzheimer’s early on, as early as 10 years, so it doesn’t really come as a surprise to learn that technology is ...

Mon 18 Sep 17 from Ubergizmo

Satellites help predict malaria outbreaks months in advance

Malaria is one of the greatest health threats in tropical regions like the Amazon, but predicting its spread is difficult. While it's no secret that mosquitoes prefer warm air ...

Sun 17 Sep 17 from Engadget

Researchers tap NASA satellites to predict Malaria

A group of researchers is using data from NASA satellites to predict outbreaks of Malaria, which is difficult to track and control because it spreads mostly in remote areas.

Wed 13 Sep 17 from Daily Mail

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