Experimental peanut allergy patch shows promise

Credit: Annick Vanderschelden Photography via Getty ImagesHaving a food allergy requires more than a change in diet. For many people with a moderate to severe allergy, it requires a change in lifestyle.   In the United States, one of the most common food allergies is peanuts, an ingredient found in everything from lunch sandwiches to chili. In 2014, two percent of children in the United States under the age of 18 had a peanut allergy. It is the most common cause of anaphylaxis, a reaction in which a person experiences itchiness, swelling of the throat, plummeting blood pressure, fainting, or vomiting. When severe reactions are not treated with an emergency injection of epinephrine, the effect can sometimes be fatal.   While there is no cure for a peanut allergy, scientists are working on various treatments that can at least reduce the severity of reactions to the nut. Immunotherapy, where the patient is exposed to very small amounts of peanut protein over time, has garnered the atte

Experimental peanut allergy patch shows promise

An experimental patch that delivers a high dose of peanut protein has shown promise in reducing allergic reactions in children and adults, researchers said on Tuesday.

Wed 15 Nov 17 from Medical Xpress

A skin patch currently undergoing clinical trials delivers a high dose of peanut protein and appears to successfully reduce peanut allergies in children and adults.

Credit: Annick Vanderschelden Photography via Getty ImagesHaving a food allergy requires more than a change in diet. For many people with a moderate to severe allergy, it requires ...

Thu 16 Nov 17 from Discovery News

Early trial of peanut patch for peanut allergy shows promise

Tue 14 Nov 17 from Phys.org (news wire)

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