Researchers identify 'social place cells' in the brain that respond to the locations of others

Whether we're playing a team sport or just strolling with our family through the park, we're continually aware of the positions of those around us - and where each is heading. Scientists have, in recent decades, pinpointed neurons called "place cells" in our brains that encode our own location in the environment, but how our brains represent the positions of others has been a mystery. New Weizmann Institute of Science research in bats, which was published in Science, reveals a sub-population of neurons that encode the specific location of other bats that are flying nearby.

Researchers identify 'social place cells' in the brain that respond to the locations of others

Whether we're playing a team sport or just strolling with our family through the park, we're continually aware of the positions of those around us - and where each is heading. Scientists have, ...

Tue 16 Jan 18 from Phys.org

The brain's GPS has a buddy system

To be successful as a social animal, you need to know where you stand relative to others. Brain cells that perform precisely this function—locating the 'self' and others in space—have now been ...

Thu 11 Jan 18 from Medical Xpress

The brain's GPS has a buddy system, Thu 11 Jan 18 from ScienceDaily

Mapping the social landscape

Scientists have, in recent decades, pinpointed neurons called 'place cells' in our brains that encode our own location in the environment, but how our brains represent the positions of others ...

Tue 16 Jan 18 from ScienceDaily

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